Water Efficiency Strategy

The City of Greater Sudbury (CGS) has undertaken the development of a Water Efficiency Strategy to determine why demands in the City have declined in recent years, to project future water demand and water production rates in the City until 2031, to satisfy legislative requirements/recommendations, and to determine if it would be practically and financially beneficial for the City to establish active programs to further reduce water demands.

By optimizing water efficiency in its six water supply systems, the CGS will:

  • increase water security and sustainability,
  • increase operational efficiencies,
  • reduce environmental impacts,
  • minimize the need to expand water treatment/water distribution infrastructure, and
  • minimize the need for water rate increases.

Learn more

We’ve prepared a presentation that provides more information on this Strategy, including:

  • an overview of water demand trends in Ontario, Canada, and the USA;
  • an explanation of why water demands in North America have declined in recent years;
  • an analysis of historical residential and commercial water demand trends in the CGS;
  • a comparison between winter day vs. summer day demands in the CGS;
  • projected water demand and water production rates in the CGS until 2031;
  • an overview of water efficiency programs previously/currently implemented by the City; and
  • recommended water efficiency measures to be implemented by the CGS going forward.

The City of Greater Sudbury (CGS) has undertaken the development of a Water Efficiency Strategy to determine why demands in the City have declined in recent years, to project future water demand and water production rates in the City until 2031, to satisfy legislative requirements/recommendations, and to determine if it would be practically and financially beneficial for the City to establish active programs to further reduce water demands.

By optimizing water efficiency in its six water supply systems, the CGS will:

  • increase water security and sustainability,
  • increase operational efficiencies,
  • reduce environmental impacts,
  • minimize the need to expand water treatment/water distribution infrastructure, and
  • minimize the need for water rate increases.

Learn more

We’ve prepared a presentation that provides more information on this Strategy, including:

  • an overview of water demand trends in Ontario, Canada, and the USA;
  • an explanation of why water demands in North America have declined in recent years;
  • an analysis of historical residential and commercial water demand trends in the CGS;
  • a comparison between winter day vs. summer day demands in the CGS;
  • projected water demand and water production rates in the CGS until 2031;
  • an overview of water efficiency programs previously/currently implemented by the City; and
  • recommended water efficiency measures to be implemented by the CGS going forward.

We appreciate your feedback

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How can you justify a bylaw which threatens to fine a consumer for « buying »your product on an odd numbered day if he lives in an even numbered home when said product generates necessary funds as a user fee? The yearly monetary shortfalls as evidenced in the yearly increases for this infrastructure to sustain itself are mind boggling. I am not against conservation but remember that this practice has a serious counter effect as to the very reasoning behind the user fee system.

J-Y Bujold 9 days ago
Page published: 22 November 2021, 14:03